Monday, December 14, 2009

Festive Underwear

I was listening to the radio the other day, and there was a discussion with some guy who wrote a book about excellent words in other languages that we just don't have in English.  For example, the Japanese apparently have a word used by the Samurai that means "To test out a new sword on a passer-by."

Maybe that's not a word that most of us will ever need, but how often have we struggled to come up with an apposite term for something that can only otherwise be described with a string of words?

Often.  Too often.

What if, instead of describing "the grimace evoked by little crumbs of burnt toast that one's life partner invariably leaves in the butter, " one could simply say you were "discrumbled"?

Or, the random possum/horse/cat/aardvark droppings that your dog eats while out on walkies?  They'd be "faesties."

Then there's the one that bothers us at all Christmas parties: how do you describe the fancy brassiere you wear when you're expecting to get very drunk, take your top off and dance on a table?  Well, as usual, the local primary school has come up with just the word:





It disturbs me a little that the WHOLE school would be wearing one, but they're pretty progressive around here.

In case you're wondering, I think this is what a "Celebra" looks like:




(image via here )


Alongside some "Celejocks."


3 comments:

  1. For example, the Japanese apparently have a word used by the Samurai that means "To test out a new sword on a passer-by."

    Technically so do we. "Assault".

    Your local primary school worries me, even more than my local primary school does. Mine just has the one badly worded motto, yours appears to get creative on a weekly basis.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It occurs to me on re-reading this that it would have been much easier and fitted better if the sign had read:

    "10th DEC 12.30 GRIFFIN
    ASSEMBLY
    6PM WHOLE SCHOOL
    CHRISTMAS DO".

    'Celebra'. Seriously.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "Xmas celebration" would also have worked.

    Perhaps we both should have been primary school sign technicians.

    ReplyDelete

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